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Gardens

Museum Garden

PEM’s serene 5,000-square-foot garden situated off the new wing offers a mental and acoustic break from your museum experience. Designed by Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects, the garden space features nearly 300 varieties of shrubs, 60 trees, 37 species of flowers, an 11-foot cascading water feature and multiple benches to sit and relax.

An aerial view of the new museum garden
New museum garden © Peabody Essex Museum. Photography by Bob Packert.
New museum garden  detail view of a granite wall and waterfall
New museum garden © 2019 Peabody Essex Museum. Photography by Kathy Tarantola
New museum garden
New museum garden © 2019 Peabody Essex Museum. Photography by Kathy Tarantola
A detail of a granite wall with water cascading down, in the new museum garden
New museum garden © 2019 Peabody Essex Museum. Photography by Kathy Tarantola

Ropes Mansion Garden | 318 Essex Street

A 10-minute walk from PEM, the Ropes Mansion garden blooms with plant life that’s as equally appealing to butterflies as it is to visitors. Designed by Salem botanist and horticulturist John Robinson in 1912, the one-acre Colonial Revival-style garden welcomes thousands of visitors each year. Located in Salem’s McIntire Historic District, the tranquil space is open to the public 365 days a year, from dawn to dusk, at no charge. Dogs are most welcome.

The Ropes Mansion garden in full bloom with the white mansion in the background
Ropes Mansion Garden © 2019 Peabody Essex Museum.
A wooden bench and pathway in a lush garden
Ropes Mansion Garden © 2019 Peabody Essex Museum.
A stone pathway meanders through a vibrant garden
Ropes Mansion Garden © 2019 Peabody Essex Museum.
A bright pink lily on lilypads on water
Ropes Mansion Garden © 2019 Peabody Essex Museum.
The Ropes Mansion garden in full bloom with the white mansion in the background
Ropes Mansion Garden © 2019 Peabody Essex Museum.
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An odyssey into PEM’s new garden