In Defense of Arts Funding

Dinah Cardin

“Each day, 4.8 million Americans go to work in Arts and Culture industries. In fact, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the Arts contributed $730 billion to our GDP—which is larger than Construction, Transportation, and Travel & Tourism.” – AmericansForTheArts.org

Cultural institutions across the country are reeling from news that the White House plans to slash or eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, as well as the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

The arts play a critical role in today’s economy and also support the rising creative and innovation-based economy. Read more

Investigations into Chinese Export Lacquerware: Black and Gold, 1700-1850

Maria João Petsica

Dressing table, brought to Salem for William (Billy) Gray (1750-1825), 13300, c. 1800. Courtesy of the Peabody Essex Museum.

Chinese export pieces that feature the black lacquer and gold decoration are commonly designated as Canton lacquer in a clear association with the place from whence they were shipped and believed to be manufactured. Lacquer decoration referred to as Canton lacquer was produced in gold painted decoration or miao-jin. In this technique, the decorative motif was painted in gold, by means of fine brushes, over several layers of black lacquer. Objects of this kind were brought home by merchants and sea captains to furnish their homes or as gifts to family members and friends (Image 1). During the eighteenth and the first half of the nineteenth centuries, a considerable number of lacquered pieces reached Europe and the US due to the trading activities with China. The Peabody Essex Museum has several remarkable examples of this production brought back from Canton (today’s Guangzhou) on the ships belonging to private traders and members of the East India Marine Society. The primary goal of my Ph.D. research is to characterize Chinese export lacquer production from 1700 to 1850 and understand how these objects were created and traded.

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2016 Library Recap

It was another busy year in the Phillips Library.  The reading room saw a significant uptick in patron visits, we participated in a variety of exhibits and programs at the museum, and made some exciting changes to our online catalog.  We’ve also rolled out a new social media platform (Instagram here we come!) and had some guest contributors revealing fascinating wedges of our collections here on the blog.  Indulge us as we take a look back… Read more